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Open Systems SnapVault - OSSV



Installing the OSSV Linux Client

*NOTE: This documentation was written around the 3.0.1 OSSV client. It should still be valid for newer or older versions but some of the menu options may have changed
  1. Download the OSSV Linux client from the NetApp NOW site and copy it to the /tmp diretory on your Linux server - http://now.netapp.com
  2. Extract the tar file
    tar -zxvf /tmp/ossv_linux_v3.0.1.tar.gz
  3. CD into the OSSV directory
    cd /tmp/ossv
  4. Install the OSSV client. *NOTE: Make sure that DNS is setup correctly for your linux server and that you can resolve it's hostname. The OSSV install will try to look up the name of the server that you are installing on and will fail if name resolution is not working correctly
    1. Start the install
      ./install
    2. Press "y" to acknowledge that you have read the license agreement
    3. Press "Enter" to accept the default installation directory of /usr/snapvault
    4. As the Username to connect to the server via NDMP, enter "root"
    5. As the Password to connect to the server via NDMP, enter the DSS local administrator password
    6. Press "Enter" to accept the default NDMP listener port of 10000
    7. Enter the host names or IP address of the NetApp filers that are allowed to back up this server. Generally this would be just one filer, however you can specify multiple filers by separating them with a comma
  5. Add the Snapvault binaries path to the OS PATH
    1. Edit /etc/profile
      vi /etc/profile
    2. Look for this section of code in /etc/profile
      # Path manipulation
      if [ "$EUID" = "0" ]; then
              pathmunge /sbin
              pathmunge /usr/sbin
              pathmunge /usr/local/sbin
      fi
    3. Insert the following line underneath the last "pathmunge" line
      pathmunge /usr/snapvault/bin
      1. Based on the example code in step 5.b above, the final section of code should look like this
        # Path manipulation
        if [ "$EUID" = "0" ]; then
                pathmunge /sbin
                pathmunge /usr/sbin
                pathmunge /usr/local/sbin
                pathmunge /usr/snapvault/bin
        fi
    4. Save and close /etc/profile
      {ESC}
      wq
      {Enter}
  6. At this point you should be able to initialize a Snapvault relationship with the OSSV client from the secondary storage system

Backing up an entire Linux server

This section of the document outlines how to backup an entire Linux server, meaning all file systems necessary to perform a bare metal restore of the server

  1. Determine which files systems exist on the server. Every local file system mounted on the server should be backed up, except for the common runtime file systems of "swap", “/proc”, “/sys”, “/dev/pts” and “/dev/shm” that are created each time the OS loads. Any NFS mounted file systems or external FCP or iSCSI file systems can be ignored as well, you can back up these file systems using OSSV, however for this section of the document they are not considered critical since they wouldn't be needed to restore the server itself.
    1. Examine the “/etc/fstab” file for a list of file systems. The first column in “fstab” is the partition/volume path or device label and the second column is where in the file system that partition/volume was mounted. The second column contains the information that you will need when initializing your OSSV backups. Some example “fstab” files are listed below:
      1. A server using a local disk and LVM volumes
        /dev/vg00/lv_root       /                       ext3    defaults        1 1
        /dev/vg00/lv_var        /var                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        /dev/vg00/lv_home       /home                  	ext3    defaults        1 2
        /dev/vg00/lv_audit      /var/log/audit    	ext3    defaults        1 2
        /dev/vg00/lv_tmp        /tmp                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        LABEL=/boot             /boot                   ext3    defaults        1 2
        tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0
        devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0
        sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0
        proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0
        /dev/vg00/lv_swap       swap                    swap    defaults        0 0
      2. A server using a local disk with raw disk partitions
        /dev/sda2      	       /                       ext3    defaults        1 1
        /dev/sda4               /var               	ext3    defaults        1 2
        /dev/sda5               /tmp                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        LABEL=/boot             /boot                   ext3    defaults        1 2
        tmpfs                   /dev/shm	        tmpfs   defaults        0 0
        devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0
        sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0
        proc                    /proc                  	proc    defaults        0 0
        /dev/sda3       	       swap                    swap    defaults        0 0
      3. A server using a local disk via an HP Smart Array Controller
        /dev/cciss02            /                       ext3    defaults        1 1
        /dev/cciss03            /var               	ext3    defaults        1 2
        /dev/cciss04            /tmp                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        LABEL=/boot             /boot                	ext3    defaults        1 2
        tmpfs                   /dev/shm         	tmpfs   defaults        0 0
        devpts                  /dev/pts           	devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0
        sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0
        proc                    /proc                 	proc    defaults        0 0
        /dev/sw-cciss           swap                  	swap    defaults        0 0
      4. A server using disk labels to identify the underlying device
        LABEL=/                 /                       ext3    defaults        1 1
        LABEL=/var              /var                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        LABEL=/opt              /opt                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        LABEL=/tmp              /tmp                    ext3    defaults        1 2
        LABEL=/boot1            /boot                   ext3    defaults        1 2
        tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0
        devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0
        sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0
        proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0
        LABEL=SWAP-sda2         swap                    swap    defaults        0 0
    2. Make note of which file systems you will be backing up and where those file system are mounted, such as "/", "/var", "/tmp", etc. The root "/" and boot "/boot" file systems will be the most important. You will be initializing a Snapvault relationship for each file system between the server and the NetApp filer (the secondary storage system). For each of the Snapvault relationships you should use a naming convention like <servername>_<filesystemmountpoint> so that you can easily determine which server the backup was taken from and where the file system was mounted from the OS perspective
  2. From the NetApp filer that houses the OSSV backups (the secondary storage system), initialize an OSSV backup of each file system that you wish to back up.
    snapvault start -S <your hostname or IP>:<file system mount point> <secondary storage system>:/vol/<some volume>/<servername>_<filesystemmountpoint>
    
    Example: snapvault start -S myserver:/ <filer_name>:/vol/myserver_backups/myserver_root
    Example: snapvault start -S myserver:/var <filer_name>:/vol/myserver_backups/myserver_var
    Example: snapvault start -S myserver:/boot <filer_name>:/vol/myserver_backups/myserver_boot
  3. From the NetApp filer that houses the OSSV backups (the secondary storage system), set the schedule for your OSSV backups to occur using the "snapvault snap sched" command. Refer to the NetApp documentation for the exact syntax of the command.






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